Keystroke Medium

Ep 5.19 - LIVE! Bring Your Story to Life with Damon Suede

May 19, 2020

Great characters are what readers are looking for and without them, they're likely to skip your book. Damon Suede joins Josh and Scott to talk about his techniques to take your writing voice to the next level.

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Great characters are what readers are looking for and without them, they're likely to skip your book. Damon Suede joins Josh and Scott to talk about his techniques to take your writing voice to the next level.

Hosts: Josh Hayes, Scott Moon, Damon Suede

[00:00] Opening remarks—Dragon Award Nominations are open!

[04:18] Weekly update, “F*ck You Writing Is Hard” Edition

Scott: Launching Invasion Day with a new version and cover, but Amazon is slow. Scott got promoted to Lieutenant!

Damon: On Lockdown writing romance. Working on another nonfiction in the series, Characterize! Writing fiction and coming back into screenwriting. There are no people outside of Manhattan; feels like an apocalyptic movie. Surprised there are no bicycles, toilet paper, and exercise equipment. Damon Suede’s Verbalize: bring stories to life & life to stories

Josh: Enemy of Valor (Valor #3) is ready to publish! Starting a new trilogy called Tranquility with Devon Ford. Working to have the first two novels done by end of summer. No more Valor memes!

[15:18] Bring Your Story to Life!

-Introduction to Damon Suede’s experience.

-Adjectives are worthless in writing (its descriptive).

-Verbs are the word that speaks to the action of a story and character.

-No one thinks about action for writing.

-Don’t describe… give action!

-The characters are an action and have different tactics that are synonyms of what the character does.

Example: Severus Snape vexes.

-You want to build the moral ethos (action) of the character

-Antonyms are conflict.

Example: Hannibal Lector savors.

Example: Clarice Starling saves.

Example: Fisher (in Valor) proves.

-My verbs are transitive, not intransitive.

Example: Gollum covets. He strangles, he murders, he steals, etc. in order to covet.

Example: Jane Gum also covets, but it shown differently.

-Verbs don’t have gender or race or prejudice.

L.C. Knight’s How Many Children Had Lady MacBeth?

-Dolls vs. characters.

Example: Lady MacBeth schemes.

-It’s not dialogue conflict, that’s bickering, you’re looking for friction.

-Your audience is an emotional piñata.

-If you don’t have an action for a character, you can still figure it out in your writing.

-Making characters more character

-Fatal Flaw is what screws up a character and causes them to take action.

-Character = Plot and Plot = Character

-Twatwaffles in Pulp Fiction

[1:08:00] Closing remarks

Coffee and Concepts

Writer’s Journey

Storytelling

 

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